Twitter Adds Tweet Scheduling–Sort Of

Twitter recently added a new feature that allows you to schedule your Tweets in advance. I probably won’t use it – here’s why.

The scheduling feature is embedded inside of the Twitter Ads interface. You can use it to schedule unpaid tweets, but you have to navigate to your Twitter Ads account first. You can create a Twitter Ad account for free (learn more here).

1. Go to https://ads.twitter.com or from your Twitter account, click on the gear and Select Twitter Ads:

access-twitter-ads

 

2. From the Ads dashboard, click on the blue compose button at the top, right of the page.

ads-tweet-compose

3. This will bring up the familiar dialog box for composing a tweet, but you will see three tabs at the bottom of the window. By clicking on the Scheduling tab, you can access controls to set the date and time you wish to publish your post.

tweet-schedule

The Delivery tab allows you to choose Standard (tweet to all of your followers) or Promoted-Only (tweet to users targeted in your campaign). The Promotion tab allows you select the campaign this tweet belongs.

So why did I say I probably won’t use this new feature to schedule organic (unpaid) tweets? Mostly because it is too cumbersome to access. Most of the tweets I create or share happen during the flow of my regular work. If I’m doing my morning reading and I find something I want to share, I want to compose my tweet right then and there and get it over with. Even though I have a Twitter ad account, I can’t schedule directly from within Twitter; I have to follow the steps above. It may not seem like that much extra effort, but it really interrupts my whole workflow.

That’s why I still love using Buffer, as it allows me to simply click a button on my browser toolbar, compose a post to share on Twitter or a number of other social media accounts, schedule it, and keep on moving.

I do see how the new scheduling feature inside of Twitter could be useful for those who like to sit down and schedule all of their tweets for the day, week, or month at one time.

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